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Keeping the language alive

Slideshow: A parent’s quest to teach his son (click photo)

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A new generation

Slideshow: an elder’s vow to help students (click photo)

3

The changing face of Cree

Slideshow: how Cree is evolving ………… (click photo)

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A day in the life at Kihew Waciston Cree Immersion School

Posted on April 21st, 2010 in: 1

For the 100 students at Kihew Waciston, there’s no reason to believe Cree isn’t a vibrant spoken language.

A day in the life at Kihew Waciston Cree Immersion School
Incorporating Cree beliefs in two urban schools

Incorporating Cree beliefs in two urban schools

Posted on April 21st, 2010 in: 1

A three-foot crucifix hangs in the foyer of St. Frances Elementary School. Down the hall, the smell of burning sweet grass becomes stronger.

History of Cree language programs

History of Cree language programs

Posted on April 21st, 2010 in: 1

Cree is in decline. Immersion and bilingual programs have popped up in the last decade and a half to stem the loss.

Word collecting

Word collecting

Posted on April 21st, 2010 in: 1

New Cree words are being created all the time – and old ones revived – in this sunny room at the immersion school.

Not just words but culture

Not just words but culture

Posted on April 21st, 2010 in: 1

The feast is tomorrow. For Strongarm, activities like this give context, meaning, and validity to the words.

Surrounded by English

Surrounded by English

Posted on April 20th, 2010 in: 1

In Lloydminster you won’t hear much Cree – on the streets or on the radio.

Finding teachers

Finding teachers

Posted on April 20th, 2010 in: 1

Finding qualified teachers and support staff for Cree-language programs continues to be a challenge.

Government action

Government action

Posted on April 20th, 2010 in: 1

In June 2009 Senator Serge Joyal introduced a federal bill aimed at revitalizing Canada’s 50 existing First Nations, Inuktitut, and Métis languages.

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